Failure to Perform C-Section

Filed under Birth Injury, Stillbirth

The Allex Case

Our client, a first-time mother, had an uncomplicated pregnancy.

One week prior to full term, the mother reported contractions and was told to come to the hospital. Labor was progressing slowly so the OB/GYN manually ruptured her membranes to accelerate labor.

For the next 14 hours, there was substantial meconium to the extent that the bed linens had to be changed several times. The fetal heart tones dropped ominously and stayed depressed three times and three times the residents took our client to the delivery room for emergency cesarean section. The first two times in the operating room, the attending OB/GYN ordered her back to the labor suite without explanation.

When a cesarean section was finally performed, the baby was limp and had to be resuscitated. The baby died within 12 hours.

Suit was filed against the delivery hospital for failure of the covering residents and attending OB/GYN to perform a cesarean section when the fetus displayed ominous signs and symptoms of severe fetal distress. Discovery in this case revealed a number of documents generated by the defendant teaching hospital disclosing a program to reduce the number of C-sections for cost-saving purposes.

The case settled early in the litigation process.

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Publisher: Harry S. Cohen and Associates, P.C.